In the Beginning

TypoOhNo

BathroomTypoAlert

Photo courtesy of Jason Neeley

This typo’s home was a restaurant bathroom on a seat cover dispenser. The directions meant to say, “first pull up.” It appears that no one spell checked this and “first” got typo jacked. Can you believe that somebody actually paid for this?

Typos never have a place in formal communication. However, they are quite prominent and doubly appalling when statements begin with them, especially when messages are brief. I have seen “Judgement (correct: Judgment) Day.” Another time, I witnessed “Highering (correct: Hiring) Managers” as a call-out in the job section.

As they say, the more things change, the more they stay the same. The typos may be different each time but my advice on this topic never is: ALWAYS slow down when you write, consult reference literature and enlist in help from others…

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Hazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass but to educate.

Typos For Conservation

TypoOhNo

CharityTypoPosterForBlog

I recently saw this poster for water conservation at a car wash. Apparently, someone didn’t double-check this before it went to the printer and “environment” was typo bombed.

Of course all written public messages should be polished, but it’s especially disheartening when messages for charity and environmental awareness have typos. I have seen things like “pubic affairs” for public affairs and “Save the Wales (That’s a country!)” instead of Save the Whales.

We broadcast messages on smaller stages than these organizations, however, we still want our messages to be the focus, not mistakes. I know that I have said this a thousand times, but always use the buddy system when you write. Flyers, posters, classified ads, etc. should get not one, but two or three evaluations. Use your friends, families and coworkers for this purpose. People are usually flattered that you asked and happy to do it.

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Hazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords