Typos For Sale

TypoOhNo

PhotoTypoPaint

FryerApplianceTypo

 Image courtesy of Beverley Wright

I discovered the first typo in a catalog mailed to my house. Wow, it looks as if the other “o” in “photo” is camera-shy! The second image is riddled with transposed letters – “crispy” and “healthy” suffer from typo terror.

Finding typos in advertising copy is disconcerting. Word nerds such as myself have been known to contact the company and alert them of their errors. For Average Joe or Jane, it usually induces an eye roll, perhaps a chuckle, and a toss of the solicitation into the nearest trash bin.

We may sell things on smaller stages than these folks, like with Craigslist or eBay ads, but typos taint the most attractive product information. It’s a stream of conscious thing: sharp grammar and spelling bring something extra to the most run-of-the-mill items for sale. Take it from someone who has written copy selling everything from eyeglasses to evening dresses. What are some typos you have seen in sales copy? I look forward to your comments and stories.

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Bubble Bath Twelve, Hazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass but to educate.

Apostrophe Angst

TypoOhNo

LaundryTypo

Image courtesy of James Otis

Mr. Otis sums it up pretty well: “The care for clothes that money cant buy?” Yes, that pesky apostrophe. But isn’t this laundry a business that cleans clothes in exchange for money? Do they refuse to offer the very best care? Or do they sell all but the very best care, which they give or barter away? Of course the phrase means that here one finds the very best care, but, punctuation aside, is just cant…

Pesky apostrophe indeed. An apostrophe is a small character that makes a big difference. In regular speech and writing, I have heard and seen “I could care less” when it should be “I couldn’t care less.” And I am sure you have witnessed misuse with “its/it’s.”

Occasional apostrophe scenarios are matters of preference. Some people write “1960’s” when others write “1960s.” I write “the Jones’ house” while others may write “the Jones’s house.” What are some of your apostrophe pet peeves or questions? I open the floor to you.

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Hazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass but to educate.

Wise Guy Typos

TypoOhNo

LeadershipTypoImage courtesy of Beverley Wright

Wow. The real leadership tragedy is the typo in “tragedy.” Where’s the “r?” My eyes and heart hurt when I see a typo or misused phrase in a slogan that’s meant to convey wisdom or vision. More of my all-time favorites:

  • Good rittens. (Should be: Good riddance.)
  • A mind is a terrible thing to lose. (Should be: A mind is a terrible thing to waste.)
  • It takes two to tangle. (Should be: It takes two to tango.)
  • For all intensive purposes. (Should be: For all intents and purposes.)
  • I will never step foot in that place again. (Should be: I will never set foot in that place again.)

These mistakes remind me of the old game telephone. They get passed around and around until the original message or correct spelling gets lost in translation. I am the first to admit that words of wisdom and idioms (figures of speech) can be tricky. However, it pays to take the time to say and write them correctly, no matter how obsolete and awkward the original saying is. Because when you have errors in your words of wisdom – whether they be typos or misused phrases – you are like the cobbler’s children with no shoes! I regularly visit the site http://www.idiomsite.com/. Feel free to as well.

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Hazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass but to educate.