That Takes the Cake

TypoOhNo

CakeTypo

Image courtesy of Tamara Stokes

What happened to the “c” in “excellence?” Such a bitter irony on this sweet confection; it’s the centerpiece for a scholarly cause. This is another case of a silent letter tripping up someone. The cake decorator was at a real disadvantage because there is no spell-check for pastries. And it’s confusing because “exercise” sounds the same, but has no “c.” Anyway, let’s look at more typos that occur with the vexing silent letter:

  • Mathematics. You don’t hear the “e.”
  • Jacquard. The “qu” is silent.
  • Efficient. We don’t pronounce the “i.”

It’s too late for the baker above, but my advice stays the same for the future: when in doubt, consult the dictionary and use your friends and relatives.

Happy reading and writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Bubble Bath TwelveHazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass, but to educate.

We Didn’t Mean That

TypoOhNo

 

 

 

 

 

TypoinJob

Photo courtesy of Sharon King

Holy career-killer! Who wants to work for “$10-12/year?” Unfortunately, typos possess power to convey a totally different meaning than what was intended. The writer slaps his or her forehead and thinks, “We didn’t mean that.” These typos are the thorniest because they cause poor ad response, like the one above. Or they create angry customers who attempt to redeem the offers when the typos are in their favor. They are suspicious when told that it’s a typo and feel that it’s perhaps bait and switch, fraud, and so on.

Many don’t realize that published writing is like putting on a show. It is a group effort between the writer, editor, and publisher. They come together to put the best words forward. This is true for the average person, too, in any writing other than informal emails or text messages. Think about it: every time we write resumes, cover letters for resumes, or a formal request to city hall, we ask our spouses, friends, and relatives to read over our writing to catch those typo gremlins. Can you imagine a salary requirement on your resume for $10-12/year slipping through? Yikes!

Keep using your resources and happy writing, my friends!

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short stories Bubble Bath TwelveHazel Hogan and Devil Does Dallas. She is also an editor. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit http://www.iwrightaway.com/.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@aol.com. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for the real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass but to educate.