Are You [In]Sure?

TypoOhNo

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Have mercy. I believe the poor soul meant his company is “insured.” I saw this landscaping company truck on the street, and it took me a minute to understand what “insuraced” meant.

There are other adjectives people say and write incorrectly all the time, and it has become widely accepted. With the exception of the last one, I was guilty of saying and writing these wrong, too, for many years:

  • Complected – It should be complexioned, as in dark- or light-complexioned.
  • Headed, describing hair – It should be haired, as in red-haired, NOT red-headed.
  • Scotch-free – It should be Scot-free.

Are there adjectives you’ve heard people say or write incorrectly? If so, please share. I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

SpaghettiWords

Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@sbcglobal.net. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for The Real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass, but to educate.

Lady Rouge Pen Says: Avoid “Pretty”

Ladyrougepen2016

Use spicy adjectives. Instead of “pretty,” try arresting, attractive, elegant, colorful, and poised. Click here for a demo video on replacing “pretty” with stronger adjectives.

Lady Rouge Pen is also on Twitter; search #ladyrougepen.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…Write Sticky

Ladyrougepen2016

Write “sticky,” touching all 5 senses:

  1. The smell of rain or a professor’s aftershave
  2. A setting orange sun
  3. The bumpy texture of a chenille bedspread
  4. The taste of strong coffee
  5. The ring of a tinny bell

Lady Rouge Pen is also on Twitter; search #ladyrougepen.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen…

Ladyrougepen2016

Stationery or stationary? It’s easy to remember with this mnemonic device:

“Stationery” and “letter” both have an “e.”

“Stationary” and “aerobic” both have an “a.”

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…

Ladyrougepen2016

Take this little quiz that follows. It will give you an idea of how much you do or don’t need assistance with your writing. What’s wrong with each of these sentences?

  1. Lay down if you feel faint.
  2. Everybody has their quirks.
  3. We had saw the men in the alley before.
  4. I had alot of work to do to prepare for the party.
  5. Woe is me.
  6. The waitress appreciated me stacking my dishes after I ate.
  7. The lake was real serene at sunset.

Scroll down for the answers.

 

Answers:

  1. Lie down if you feel faint.  (The verb “lay” is for placing things, such as: Don’t lay your coat on the floor.)
  2. Everybody has his or her quirks.  (You would use “their” if the subject was plural.  Example:  All the students had their books.  “Everybody” is a singular subject. 
  3. We had seen the men in the alley before.  (The correct past participle that goes with “had” in this case is “seen,” not “saw.”)
  4. I had a lot of work to do to prepare for the party.  (The term “a lot” is NOT one word.  Surprise!)
  5. Woe is I.  (You need a subject here, not a direct object.  Reverse the sentence and it does not work:  Me is woe?”)
  6. The waitress seemed to appreciate my stacking my dishes after I ate. (A possessive pronoun is needed.)
  7. The lake looked really serene at sunset.  (“Real” is an adjective, as in a real diamond.  This sentence calls for an adverb, which is “really.”)

Don’t fret if you did not do well on the quiz; those are the most common grammar mistakes made in writing.  Sean can help you avoid those mishaps in the future.  Take some time to look around this site, get to know Ms. Wright and consider what she can do for you. . .

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey RileyFor more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…

Ladyrougepen2016

Put tragic flaws in characters to make them leap off the pages. Cheryl can be a wine connoisseur, but a nail-biter. Reginald can be great at math, but a have a slight speech impediment.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.