Trade in “Pretty” for Something More Attractive

Ditch the vanilla word “pretty” for these spicier words. Find out how in this under 2-minute video: https://youtu.be/bf_h8FmIr04

 

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Honey Riley: A Clairvoyant Tale

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Want a book about a strong female protagonist? May I suggest the novella, Honey Riley.

The Knowing came that Indian summer. Honey’s head ached and her limbs tingled. . .

Honey Riley, born of violence, inherits the precious gift of clairvoyance. Her extraordinary talent keeps others from harm, but can’t protect her or the ones she loves from tragedy. Even though her heroic life often smacks of pain, Honey unselfishly remains loyal to her sixth sense in her 75-year journey. . .

4/5 stars. Get the book here.

 

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Flash Fiction: Indigo & Violet

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Indigo & Violet

by Sean C. Wright-Neeley

Violet Jones stood scowling backstage in their dressing room. Her arms were folded tightly under her breasts. She refused to look at her husband, Indigo. “Baby, I know you’re mad,” he said, softly, “but can we talk about this after the show? They’re waiting for us, and the preceding act is nearly done.”

“I know,” she huffed, “but I’m even too upset to perform. What the hell’s the matter with you, loaning one of our best cumulus cloud chairs to your sister without discussing it with me first? It was a wedding present!”

“I’m sorry,” Indigo said, putting his hands on Violet’s shoulders from behind, “I truly am. Yes, I should have talked to you first, but Blue is family and she needed one. Hers turned cirrus; wispy. We have others. I figured we could spare one.”

There was a banging on their dressing room door, followed by a desperate cry, “You guys ready? Rain’s act ended ten seconds ago, and he’s stalling for us!”

“Coming!” Indigo yelled back.

Violet uncrossed her arms, and turned to face Indigo. “I love you, but we’re supposed to be a team. Don’t make decisions without me.”

“I rarely do that, but Blue didn’t have a comfortable place to sit in her home. And I think the real issue here is that you don’t like my sister.”

Violet twisted her mouth. She couldn’t deny that. Instead, she muttered: “Well, I can’t be mad at you for being a thoughtful brother.” She stepped forward, and planted a kiss on Indigo’s lips, ruffled his midnight-blue hair. He smiled.

“How do I look?” she asked, stepping back and twirling in a flurry of purple ruffles.

“Beautiful, as always,” Indigo answered.

“Then let’s go out there, and wow them,” she said softly. Violet then smiled, grabbed her husband’s hand, and they both tore out of the dressing room.

The others looked peeved, but relieved to see them, as they milled around backstage. Red frowned, and hissed, “You held up everyone!”

“Sorry,” Violet said, “it won’t happen again.”

Red turned away, and pulled back the sky curtain. She whistled, which was the cue that Rain’s performance was done, and theirs was ready to begin. “Places, everyone!” she stage-whispered when Rain started his exit.

Red linked arms with Orange.

Orange linked arms with Yellow.

Yellow linked arms with Green.

Green linked arms Blue.

Blue linked arms with his sister, Indigo.

Indigo linked arms with his wife, Violet.

The seven colors then did a graceful, unified slide onto the gray sky set. They had no speaking parts, but they were to remain tightly linked, and not move for some time – until they got the Sun’s cue that she was ready to take over the stage…

People on the ground stared up at their formation, in happy awe, as always, completely oblivious as to how much hard work it took to make a rainbow.

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Lady Rougepen Says: Dress up “Rude” with this Vocabulary Word

Solipsism means “alone” or “self” in Latin; basically selfish. Example: Holly’s extreme display of solipsism left her with few friends.

Another fun fact: The root of that word (solop) means the B-word or “bastard” in French! Oh, la la! English uses a derivative, too, with “slop.”

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

3 Gripes From a Frustrated Indie Author

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I signed up for the good, the bad, and the ugly in becoming an indie author. The good? Absolute creative control. The bad? As with any writer: writer’s block, nasty reviews, and disappointing book sales always hover, like bloodthirsty mosquitoes. The ugly? I’m about to get into that. There are some annoyances that are unique to indie authors. I have since learned not to take any of these things personally, and to push back, if I even get a whiff of disdain. So, here are the not-so-nice things I hear while on my independent writing journey, and my brilliant rebuttals.

Indie authors are lower-quality writers because they don’t have agents. Some readers assume that you’re an indie author because no agent would take you. That might be true to some extent, but as I stated before, you possess absolute control over your writing projects when you’re an indie author. Go with an agent, or publishing house, and they will often ask you to change certain lines in your books, or decide which covers the books will have. They sometimes even change book titles. I once had a short story, changed so much by a publisher, that hardly any of my original words remained. Yikes. As anyone in the creative field knows, your projects are your babies. And we indie authors can dress our babies however we like. If you want publishers to publish your book, you have to submit to their soul-killing demands. I love that I can release my own words, well, in my own words, design the cover artwork, set my own deadlines, and choose how the book will be marketed.

If people don’t want to read something you wrote because it’s not in a genre they like, fine. But to put a cigarette out on an author’s head because he or she is sans a literary agent is book snobbery. And frankly, it really frosts my cookie. Some superb classics were self-published books: Eragon, The Joy of Cooking, Peter Rabbit, What Color is Your Parachute?, and many more. And some books published by big publishing houses (sorry, not sorry) are garbage.

How about a freebie? Anyone who knows me knows that I’m generous, but this is business. You wouldn’t ask a clothing designer for a free evening gown. And in the writing community, you wouldn’t dare ask Terry McMillan for one of her books for free, so why do people feel it’s fine to ask self-publishers for free copies of their books? It’s very baffling. Sometimes, it’s overt. “I don’t have a Kindle, could you send me a paperback?” Sometimes, it’s covert. “I would love to be a beta reader for that book. Let me know if you need one.” Please stop asking indie authors to gift you with free copies of their books. They usually do giveaways, anyhow, so there are plenty of chances to win one. Or we like to give them as gifts. Either way, wait until we offer a free copy for your enjoyment, or for feedback. Please don’t ask.

Hold my hand. This builds on my preceding gripe. It’s okay to ask fellow indie authors for advice, if you’re attempting your own writing journey, too, but compensate them for their time if it’s a huge favor. I once had a fellow self-publisher message me, asking if I would be his tech support, while he set up his book on the publishing website. I was at work at the time, so I was annoyed. I politely replied that he needed to contact the site’s help line to walk him through each screen. They get paid for that service; not me. Then there are the fellow writers who ask you to edit or beta-read their manuscripts for free. I totally understand that writers are starving people, but at least offer to barter; a free, signed copy of your book, buying dinner, a gift card, posting about their books on your blog, etc. We all win in the indie writing community when we support each other –  and feed each other.

So fellow self-publishers, what challenges have you noticed or faced in your lone wolf writing journey? I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

What Are You Reading?

Nothing? Then give Skoll’s Diary a try.

Get the book here.

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy