Oh No Typos Presents: A Posterior View

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I found this typo on a document while proofreading, so thank goodness that it didn’t get out. But can you imagine if it had? It implies the plural form of another word for donkeys, or ahem, a slang term for multiple backsides. This mistake if often made with words that have double consonants in the middle, and one gets omitted. Others are:

  • Committed
  • Harassment
  • Embarrass
  • Bookkeeper
  • Questionnaire

Can you think of more? And what mnemonic devices do you use to remember to double the consonants of these words, or similar ones? I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of 7 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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Oh No Typos Presents: AR or ER?

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I saw this on a menu. “Tartar” is one of those words with an ending that sounds like “ER,” but is really “AR.” Some others that people confuse the “A” and “E” in:

  • Separate. The middle letter is an “A.” The way I remember is that there is A RAT in “separate.”
  • Lavender. People often end this word in “AR.” The way I remember the “E” at the end is that lavender is a flower. They both end in “ER.”
  • Category. The middle letter is an “E.” How do you remember? “Catty” sounds like “Cat-e.” You’ve just spelled the first 4 letters correctly.

Can you think of more? Also, what are some funny or appalling typos you have seen? I open the floor to you. And please feel free to see me expand on this issue in my blog post  3 REASONS PROOFREADING IS A NECESSARY POSITION

Sean C. Wright is the author of 7 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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Oh No Typo: Cracking Up

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I saw this typo on a coupon, and I must say that I cackled at this error on “crackers.” I don’t know about you, but when there are errors in a company’s written messages, I think the following:

  • They are apathetic.
  • They are hasty.
  • They are sloppy.
  • Their quality is questionable, all across the board.

What are some funny or appalling typos you have seen? I open the floor to you. And please feel free to see me expand on this issue in my blog post  3 REASONS PROOFREADING IS A NECESSARY POSITION

Sean C. Wright is the author of 7 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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Lady Rougepen Says…Send Malapropisms Packing

Malapropisms are incorrect versions of common phrases, such as “all intensive purposes” for “all intents and purposes.” Or “it takes two to tangle” when it should be “two to tango.”

They damage your credibility. Look up the phrases to verify which phrase is correct if you must. You owe it to yourself to not speak or write snicker-worthy sayings.

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Sean C. Wright is the author of 5 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Shade-of-Blue Spelling Blunder

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Turquoise MisspellingPhoto courtesy of Tamara Stokes

The people who wrote this probably meant no disrespect to this stunning, aqua stone, spelling it phonetically. But in their defense, “turquoise” does sound like it should be spelled like these other words that do have a TE as the first two letters:

  • Terrible
  • Terrific
  • Terrace
  • Terrestrial

So how do you remember how to spell “turquoise” correctly, if you have no dictionary access? Easy. “Turquoise” and “turkey” both have the same two letters. Some turkeys have turquoise feathers. It’s a crazy mnemonic device, but it works.

What words are hard for you to remember how to spell? And what mnemonic devices do you use to spell them correctly? I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of 6 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…Woe, Mama!

 

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It’s really not “Woe is me.” It’s “Woe am I.”

Reverse it, and “Woe is me” doesn’t work: “Me is woe.” Spread the word that it’s “Woe am I!”

Lady Rouge Pen is also on Twitter; search #ladyrougepen.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…Respect the Past Participle

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Use the past participle correctly.

Incorrect: We had saw the men in the alley before.

Correct: We had seen the men in the alley before.

Lady Rouge Pen is also on Twitter; search #ladyrougepen.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Lady Rouge Pen Says…You Speak Some French

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You speak some French: ballet, RSVP (Repondez-vous s’il vous plait), hors d’oeuvres, matinee, rendezvous, and garçon.

Lady Rouge Pen is also on Twitter; search #ladyrougepen.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

Are You [In]Sure?

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Have mercy. I believe the poor soul meant his company is “insured.” I saw this landscaping company truck on the street, and it took me a minute to understand what “insuraced” meant.

There are other adjectives people say and write incorrectly all the time, and it has become widely accepted. With the exception of the last one, I was guilty of saying and writing these wrong, too, for many years:

  • Complected – It should be complexioned, as in dark- or light-complexioned.
  • Headed, describing hair – It should be haired, as in red-haired, NOT red-headed.
  • Scotch-free – It should be Scot-free.

Are there adjectives you’ve heard people say or write incorrectly? If so, please share. I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of the short story collection A Gathering of Butterflies and the novella Honey Riley. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

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Send me your typo images! Snap pictures and email them to msseanc@sbcglobal.net. They must be real pictures and not images in online links, as those might be doctored. I’m looking for The Real McCoy. Conceal the company’s identity if possible. No sweat if you can’t. I’ll hide the name before I post it. We’re not looking to embarrass, but to educate.