Let This Wright Help You Write Right

Hello! I am officially Seanarchy Marketing now. Here’s my new logo. Note the fountain pen body, and that the monarch’s wings are red, too:

I offer an array of services:

  • Copywriting/ghostwriting
  • Resume creation & revision
  • Proofreading/editing
  • Newsletters
  • Blog postings
  • Social media
  • Email blasts 
  • Graphic design
  • FREE ESTIMATES!

Feel free to click on the Contact section for free quotes, or questions.

IMG_4170

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Lady Rougepen Says: Of Biblical Proportions

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We get many sayings from The Good Book. Here are some of the most common:

  • See the writing on the wall. (Daniel 5:5-6; to be warned of something detrimental)
  • Forbidden fruit (Genesis 2:16-17; something that’s more appealing because you can’t have it.)
  • Land of milk and honey (Exodus 3:8; paradise)
  • Apple of my eye (Deuteronomy 32:10; adored one)
  • Bite the dust. (Psalms 72:9; death, as in we return to the dust, upon death)
  • For everything, there is a season. (Eccelesiates 3:1; you can’t force something to happen if it’s not time.)
  • Cross to bear (Matthew 16:24; personal hardship)
  • The eleventh hour (Matthew 20:6; the moment before it’s too late, just in time)
  • The powers that be (Romans 13:11; authority figures)

3 Gripes From a Frustrated Indie Author

Speedwriting

I signed up for the good, the bad, and the ugly in becoming an indie author. The good? Absolute creative control. The bad? As with any writer: writer’s block, nasty reviews, and disappointing book sales always hover, like bloodthirsty mosquitoes. The ugly? I’m about to get into that. There are some annoyances that are unique to indie authors. I have since learned not to take any of these things personally, and to push back, if I even get a whiff of disdain. So, here are the not-so-nice things I hear while on my independent writing journey, and my brilliant rebuttals.

Indie authors are lower-quality writers because they don’t have agents. Some readers assume that you’re an indie author because no agent would take you. That might be true to some extent, but as I stated before, you possess absolute control over your writing projects when you’re an indie author. Go with an agent, or publishing house, and they will often ask you to change certain lines in your books, or decide which covers the books will have. They sometimes even change book titles. I once had a short story, changed so much by a publisher, that hardly any of my original words remained. Yikes. As anyone in the creative field knows, your projects are your babies. And we indie authors can dress our babies however we like. If you want publishers to publish your book, you have to submit to their soul-killing demands. I love that I can release my own words, well, in my own words, design the cover artwork, set my own deadlines, and choose how the book will be marketed.

If people don’t want to read something you wrote because it’s not in a genre they like, fine. But to put a cigarette out on an author’s head because he or she is sans a literary agent is book snobbery. And frankly, it really frosts my cookie. Some superb classics were self-published books: Eragon, The Joy of Cooking, Peter Rabbit, What Color is Your Parachute?, and many more. And some books published by big publishing houses (sorry, not sorry) are garbage.

How about a freebie? Anyone who knows me knows that I’m generous, but this is business. You wouldn’t ask a clothing designer for a free evening gown. And in the writing community, you wouldn’t dare ask Terry McMillan for one of her books for free, so why do people feel it’s fine to ask self-publishers for free copies of their books? It’s very baffling. Sometimes, it’s overt. “I don’t have a Kindle, could you send me a paperback?” Sometimes, it’s covert. “I would love to be a beta reader for that book. Let me know if you need one.” Please stop asking indie authors to gift you with free copies of their books. They usually do giveaways, anyhow, so there are plenty of chances to win one. Or we like to give them as gifts. Either way, wait until we offer a free copy for your enjoyment, or for feedback. Please don’t ask.

Hold my hand. This builds on my preceding gripe. It’s okay to ask fellow indie authors for advice, if you’re attempting your own writing journey, too, but compensate them for their time if it’s a huge favor. I once had a fellow self-publisher message me, asking if I would be his tech support, while he set up his book on the publishing website. I was at work at the time, so I was annoyed. I politely replied that he needed to contact the site’s help line to walk him through each screen. They get paid for that service; not me. Then there are the fellow writers who ask you to edit or beta-read their manuscripts for free. I totally understand that writers are starving people, but at least offer to barter; a free, signed copy of your book, buying dinner, a gift card, posting about their books on your blog, etc. We all win in the indie writing community when we support each other –  and feed each other.

So fellow self-publishers, what challenges have you noticed or faced in your lone wolf writing journey? I open the floor to you.

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

IMG_4170

 

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Lady Rougepen Says: You Speak German

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English , as you know, is a mosaic of other different languages. Let’s look at some words that originate from our brothers and sisters who brought us Volkswagen and streusel pastries. The following words are German:

  • Poltergeist
  • Wunderkind
  • Kindergarten
  • Frankfurter
  • Zeitgeist
  • Bratwurst
  • Hamburger

What are some other German words you can think of that crept into English?

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

IMG_4170

 

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Let This Wright Help You Write Right

Hello! I am officially Seanarchy Marketing now. Here’s my new logo. Note the fountain pen body, and that the monarch’s wings are red, too:

I offer an array of services:

  • Copywriting/ghostwriting
  • Resume creation & revision
  • Proofreading/editing
  • Newsletters
  • Blog postings
  • Social media
  • Email blasts 
  • Graphic design
  • FREE ESTIMATES!

Feel free to click on the Contact section for free quotes, or questions.

IMG_4170

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

3 Steps to Sharper Writing

PrettyGirlWriting

Not everyone reads, but everyone writes. Writing evolved from using a fountain pen and parchment paper to clunky typewriters to typing on computers. Even though we communicate electronically for the most part these days, the writing craft still calls for good grammar. Here’s a crash course in how to cut and polish your written words:

1. Tighten it up/cut the fluff. These two phrases say the same thing. Which one would you rather read? I like Vera Wang’s clothes because they’re pretty. I especially like their flattering cuts and they have my favorite things on them, like colorful prints and sparkles for the evening. Or, I favor designer Vera Wang’s clothes for their curve-friendly designs, use of vivid prints, and glamorous sequin and bead embellishments. I’m pretty sure you said the second one. Why? Because it’s clean and direct. It’s fine for first drafts to look like the first sentence, but go through and eliminate wordiness, run-on sentences and repetition.

2. Limit linking verbs. Linking verbs are the vanilla of writing; am, are, is , was, were, be, being, been, has, have, had. We need them, however, there are much more “vivid” verbs out there. Jason scored the most points in his last three basketball games carries more impact than Jason is the best basketball player on his team.

3. Know the difference. People often confuse these three pairs. They are not the worst offenses, but it’s impressive if you master their subtle differences.

  • Recognize/realize. You recognize a person, place or thing (noun). You realize a fact. For example, Sheila recognized that cat as the neighbor’s or I didn’t realize that I bought the wrong flavor ice cream until I was halfway home.
  • Persuade/convince. You persuade someone to do something. You convince someone to think or believe something. Larry can persuade anyone to loan him money vs. I couldn’t convince my friend that I was a police officer calling and my practical joke failed.
  • Fewer/less. Fewer is for single quantities, like people, cookies, problems, and so on. Less is for clump quantities, like water, grass, lotion. There will always be “fewer people” but “less soup.”

Don’t forget to infuse as much personality into your writing as you please!

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Let This Wright Help You Write Right

Hello! I am officially Seanarchy Marketing now. Here’s my new logo. Note the fountain pen body, and that the monarch’s wings are red, too:

I offer an array of services:

  • Copywriting/ghostwriting
  • Resume creation & revision
  • Proofreading/editing
  • Newsletters
  • Blog postings
  • Social media
  • Email blasts 
  • Graphic design
  • FREE ESTIMATES!

Feel free to click on the Contact section for free quotes, or questions.

IMG_4170

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

3 Steps to Sharper Writing

PrettyGirlWriting

 

Not everyone reads, but everyone writes. Writing evolved from using a fountain pen and parchment paper to clunky typewriters to typing on computers. Even though we communicate electronically for the most part these days, the writing craft still calls for good grammar. Here’s a crash course in how to cut and polish your written words:

1. Tighten it up/cut the fluff. These two phrases say the same thing. Which one would you rather read? I like Vera Wang’s clothes because they’re pretty. I especially like their flattering cuts and they have my favorite things on them, like colorful prints and sparkles for the evening. Or, I favor designer Vera Wang’s clothes for their curve-friendly designs, use of vivid prints, and glamorous sequin and bead embellishments. I’m pretty sure you said the second one. Why? Because it’s clean and direct. It’s fine for first drafts to look like the first sentence, but go through and eliminate wordiness, run-on sentences and repetition.

2. Limit linking verbs. Linking verbs are the vanilla of writing; am, are, is , was, were, be, being, been, has, have, had. We need them, however, there are much more “vivid” verbs out there. Jason scored the most points in his last three basketball games carries more impact than Jason is the best basketball player on his team.

3. Know the difference. People often confuse these three pairs. They are not the worst offenses, but it’s impressive if you master their subtle differences.

  • Recognize/realize. You recognize a person, place or thing (noun). You realize a fact. For example, Sheila recognized that cat as the neighbor’s or I didn’t realize that I bought the wrong flavor ice cream until I was halfway home.
  • Persuade/convince. You persuade someone to do something. You convince someone to think or believe something. Larry can persuade anyone to loan him money vs. I couldn’t convince my friend that I was a police officer calling and my practical joke failed.
  • Fewer/less. Fewer is for single quantities, like people, cookies, problems, and so on. Less is for clump quantities, like water, grass, lotion. There will always be “fewer people” but “less soup.”

Don’t forget to infuse as much personality into your writing as you please!

Sean C. Wright is the author of 8 books. For more information about her writing skills and how she can assist you with yours–business or consumer–visit https://seanarchy.wordpress.com.

IMG_4170

 

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision.  The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Lady Rougepen Says: You’ve Got Mail

I can’t help it. As a proofreader and copywriter, I often scrutinize my direct mail copy. Here are some things that hurt potentially successful ads:

The wrong title. How many times have I gotten something for “Mr.” Sean in my mailbox? Too many times to count. Sorry to say when I get something with a male prefix, I discard it. It really frosts my cookie. It’s sad, too, because sometimes they are nice mailing labels that I would have gladly used. What a waste. 

It’s really safer for companies to use no prefix at all on mail, if they’re not sure. That way, they don’t run the risk of offending someone, or wasting printed materials.

Typos/Misspellings. True story. I once got a coupon in the mail for a burger place that advertised that they had “mild [milk] shakes,” too. We all know this is the biggest turnoff. Why? Because subconsciously you feel that if they company is sloppy about their communication, they may be sloppy with their customer service. 

Vague offers. Another true weird true story: a fast food place in our neighborhood had coupons for an unlimited item for only 99 cents. One word after “99 cents” would have made all the difference: each. The restaurant complained that people wanted 100 of those snacks all for 99 cents. Workers wasted valuable time, sounding like broken records, explaining that the snacks were 99 cents each. There were some fuming customers, and honestly, who can blame them? If there’s ambiguity in that ad, rewrite it. 

Getting customers through direct mail is a crap shoot, so thinking of everything that appeals to customers from the get-go increases your chances of getting their business. Need more copywriting help? Click here. Or please email me your email address to get on my monthly newsletter distribution list: authorseanc@gmail.com.

IMG_4170

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Hoppin’ Kangaroo Words

How cool is this?! Can you think of more?

IMG_4170

I’m pleased to announce the release of my 8th book, Skoll’s Diary.

Africans and African Americans left Earth in 1900, and went to another planet in The Milky Way to escape mistreatment…

It’s now the year 3005 on that terraformed planet. We get a peek into the life of a bright and sensitive teenaged boy, Skoll, through his journal. He loves his world, but is curious about life on Earth. Then suddenly, an epic event casts him in the middle of a difficult decision. The fate of the planet’s community is in his hands.

Get the book here. I’d appreciate your leaving a review if you read it. Thanks in advance!

Afro-Sean-Commission-Final copy